Rare nautilus seen for first time in 30 years

Biology   29 August 2015   Lswn

Image 1 "This could be the rarest animal in the world," says Peter Ward. "We need to know if Allonautilus is anywhere else, and we won't...

Are we prepared for the next big Mediterranean tsunami?

Environment   28 August 2015   Lswn

Author: Matthew Blackett, Senior lecturer in physical geography and natural hazards at Coventry University. Nearly a century has passed...

Europe hit by one of the worst droughts since 2003

Environment   20 August 2015   Lswn

The drought, which particularly affects France, Benelux, Germany, Hungary, the Czech Republic, northern Italy and northern Spain, is caused...


  • This is how ulcer bacteria clamp onto stomachs

    Biology   17 August 2015   Lswn
    This is how ulcer bacteria clamp onto stomachs
    It survives stomach acid by hiding in a layer of mucus. Once inside the mucus, H. pylori latches onto sugars naturally found on the stomach wall using its adhesion proteins. This attachment is so effective that the bacterium can resist attempts by...
  • The future of transport looks remarkably familiar

    Miscellaneous   05 August 2015   Lswn
    The future of transport looks remarkably familiar
    From autonomous vehicles and the rapid rise of Uber to the global diffusion of bike-sharing schemes, transport is changing. Developments in information technology, transport policy and behaviour by urban populations may well be causing a wholesale...
  • MARRIAGE OF TITANIUM AND GOLD MAKES A RARE MAGNET

    Chemistry   14 July 2015   Lswn
    MARRIAGE OF TITANIUM AND GOLD MAKES A RARE MAGNET
    Scientists at Rice University did so and discovered what is a first of its kind: an itinerant antiferromagnetic metal—TiAu—made from nonmagnetic constituent elements. Image - This is not the kind of magnet you would stick to a refrigerator....
  • Making new materials with micro-explosions

    Physics   29 June 2015   Lswn
    Making new materials with micro-explosions
    The new technique could lead to the simple creation and manufacture of superconductors or high-efficiency solar cells and light sensors, said leader of the research, Professor Andrei Rode, from The Australian National University (ANU). Image - from...
  • Silent flights: How owls could help make wind turbines and planes quieter

    Miscellaneous   22 June 2015   Lswn
    Silent flights: How owls could help make wind turbines and planes quieter
    Early wind tunnel tests of the coating have shown a substantial reduction in noise without any noticeable effect on aerodynamics. An investigation into how owls fly and hunt in silence has enabled researchers to develop a prototype coating for wind...
  • Evaporating water powers mini car

    Energy   20 June 2015   Community Research and Development Information Service
    Evaporating water powers mini car
    Led by Ozgur Sahin, the Columbia team has developed a miniature car that harnesses the power of evaporation to drive itself forward, as well as an evaporation-driven generator that powers a flashing LED lamp. Image - A car that uses the power of...
  • Nut consumption associated with decreased risk of some types of cancer

    Health   17 June 2015   Lswn
    Nut consumption associated with decreased risk of some types of cancer
    Nut consumption has long been hypothesized to have a role in preventing both of these diseases, but until now evidence has been inconsistent. A new systematic review and meta-analysis published in Nutrition Reviews on June 16 shows that nut...
  • Philae phones home – but the mission is about to get riskier

    Astronomy   17 June 2015   Lswn
    Philae phones home – but the mission is about to get riskier
    Author: Monica Grady Professor of Planetary and Space Sciences at The Open University Image - 1 - Philae is awake again but a cometary tail threatens its future. ESA On November 12 last year, the Philae spacecraft was released from its Rosetta...
  • To build better aircraft, watch the birdie (and the bee)

    Miscellaneous   13 June 2015   Lswn
    To build better aircraft, watch the birdie (and the bee)
    “By mimicking birds, which have similar flight constraints as planes, we can look at developing systems that can more easily adapt to different speeds and conditions such as landing, cruise, and take-off,” says Ingo Schiffner, a researcher at the...
  • Designer carbon could give batteries a makeover

    Technology   02 June 2015   Lswn
    Designer carbon could give batteries a makeover
    Author: Mark Shwartz, Stanford University. “We have developed a ‘designer carbon’ that is both versatile and controllable,” says Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford University. “Our study shows that this material...
  • Coral reefs may need more than carbon cuts

    Environment   29 May 2015   Lswn
    Coral reefs may need more than carbon cuts
    Coral reef ecosystems are considered extremely vulnerable to future climate change, due to rising sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification caused by higher atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide. Image - "In reality there is no direct choice...
  • How we recreated the early universe in the laboratory

    Physics   15 May 2015   Lswn
    How we recreated the early universe in the laboratory
    Author: Gianluca Sarri is Lecturer at the School of Mathematics and Physics at Queen's University Belfast. One of the all-time great mysteries in physics is why our universe contains more matter than antimatter, which is the equivalent of matter but...

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